Sexual Revolution Begins with Playboy Magazine

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Sexual Revolution Begins with Playboy Magazine

The sexual revolution begins with Playboy Magazine that was created solely on the back of Hugh Hefner’s determination and desire to start his own publication in 1953, one that resembled Esquire Magazine but much better. Hugh Hefner raised $8,000 from 45 investors — and even a $1,000 from his mother for him to launch the premier issue of Playboy magazine. Hefner was originally prepared to name the publication “Stag Party” however he was advised to stay clear of a hallmark infringement with the existing Stag publication.

Playboy Magazine

One of his associates recommended the name “Playboy,” after a defunct automobile company in Chicago. *There was a car manufacturer called Playboy Motor Car Corporation based in Buffalo NY 1947 and they produced only 97 cars before they went bankrupt in 1951. http://www.playboymotorcars.com/

So now the Sexual Revolution Begins with Playboy Magazine! Hugh Hefner really liked the name Playboy, as he believed that it truly reflected a rich lifestyle and sophisticated elegance. Hefner produced the very first edition of Playboy from his Hyde Park apartment in Chicago on his kitchen table, where so many other businesses in America first began. When his first issue hit newsstands in December of 1953, but Playboy did not have another publishing date since Hefner was not sure if a 2nd edition would ever be published. To increase his odd’s of success, Hefner purchased a color photo of the sexy starlet Marilyn Monroe in the nude, which had actually been taken before her motion picture star career and he put it in as the centerfold of the Playboy magazine. The first issue of Playboy rapidly sold a grand total of 50,000 copies, and the liberation of the Sexual Revolution Begins with Playboy Magazine in America. http://www.playboy.com/

The original cost to purchase a Playboy Magazine was only 50 cents! America was now entering into the 1950s and was trying to distance itself from nearly 30 years of war and financial depression. For many men Playboy magazine proved to be a welcome antidote to the sexual repression of the era. For those who first dismissed Playboy magazine as an adult publication, Playboy soon broadened its circulation with thoughtful, timely interesting articles and an with an urban presentation for the new and liberated suburban man. Establishing the image of “Playboy” the Playboy rabbit logo, illustrating the stylized profile of a rabbit using a tuxedo bow tie, appeared in the second issue and became the permanent trademark icon of the Playboy empire.

Fabulously50 Playboy Magazine Logo1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hugh Hefner selected the rabbit for its “humorous sexual connotations” and the rabbit represented being “frisky, spirited and playful” an image Hefner fostered in the publication’s short articles and cartoons. Hefner wanted to distinguish his magazine from many other men’s periodicals, which dealt with outdoorsmen and featured “he-man” fictional characters. Hefner decided he wanted Playboy magazine to deal with the more multicultural, intellectual males, while linking sex not with prostitution and hookers but rather “the girl next door” concept. From earliest inception of Playboy magazine, Hugh Hefner promoted exactly what became known as the “Playboy Philosophy.”

Hefner focused his own personal interests through the pages of Playboy Magazine concerning his beliefs about politics, lifestyle, governance and supported Hefner’s fundamental beliefs about the nature of man and woman and the discourse of human sexuality. However, Hefner never ever lost sight of the truth that it was the photographs of nude women that ultimately sold the publication over the past 60 years.

Building, designing and working on the guts of Playboy consumed much of Hugh Hefner’s life and his marital relationship. By 1956, Playboy’s circulation had actually exceeded that of competing publication Esquire, and was nearing 1 million copies a month by 1959. Hefner had likewise “walked the walk” by ending up being involved in lots of extramarital affairs with dozens of women, which Hefner’s spouse tolerated for several years, but eventually they then divorced in 1959 after having two kids, Christie and David.

The Golden Age of ‘Playboy’

In the 1960s, Hugh Hefner ended up being the persona of Playboy: the urbane sophisticate in the silk smoking jacket with pipe in hand. He adopted a wide range of intellectual pursuits, and socialized with the most famous and affluent, constantly in the company of lots of young, gorgeous women. As the publication’s increased success came to the attention of the mainstream public, Hefner was happy to depict himself as the charming icon and spokesperson for the sexual revolution that started with Playboy Magazine in the 1960s.

This was also Playboy’s golden era as ever-increasing circulation permitted Hefner to develop a large venture of “personal key” clubs. Hostesses, known as “bunnies” for their scanty bunny clothing, staffed these high-end establishments. Hefner’s Playboy Enterprises also built hotel resorts, began modeling companies, produced feature films, published books and also ran a record company. Also in the 1960s, Hefner hosted 2 short-run TV series, Playboy’s Penthouse (1959 – 1960) and Playboy After Dark (1969 -1970). Both programs were weekly talk shows set in a bachelor pad loaded with Playboy “playmates,” who would chat with Hefner and his special guests about various topics.

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But all that success didn’t come without a price. In 1963, Hugh Hefner was detained and stood trial for selling obscene literature after a problem of Playboy featured nude images of Hollywood actress Jayne Mansfield. The jury couldn’t reach a verdict, and the charge was ultimately dropped. The promotion didn’t impact the reputation of Hefner or Playboy Enterprises. In 1965, Hefner established the Playboy Foundation to provide grants to nonprofit groups fighting censorship and investigating human sexuality.

Challenges at ‘Playboy’

By 1970, Hugh Hefner had actually developed Playboy Enterprises into a major corporation. The company went public, and the publication’s circulation struck 7 million copies a month, earning a $12 million revenue in 1972. Hefner started dividing his time between 2 huge mansions in Chicago and Los Angeles. When he wasn’t home, he was globe-trotting in the “Big Bunny,” a converted DC-30 jet complete with a galley, a living room, a disco, film and video devices, a wet bar, and sleeping quarters for 16 guests. The jet likewise included a circular bed for Hefner himself.

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In the mid-1970s, Playboy Enterprises fell on to tough times. The United States also fell into an economic crisis, and Playboy dealt with new competitors from more specific men’s publications such as Penthouse & Hustler. Initially, Hefner responded by “copying the imitators” and presenting more revealing pictures of women in less wholesome poses and positions. Some advertisers rebelled, and circulation fell off even further. From then on, Hefner concentrated on the business’s operations on magazine publishing. Playboy Enterprises divested itself from the unprofitable Playboy clubs and hotels. At the m film and record business, spending plans were slashed and payroll was minimized. Playboy magazine kept its brand-new photography standards but started showcasing the more “wholesome girl next door” feel such as “Girls of the Big Ten” and placed a stronger focus on the quality and material of the articles.

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In 1975, Hefner decided to make Los Angeles his permanent home so he could carefully monitor his interests in TV and movie production. Hefner ended up being more involved in the restoration of the historic Hollywood sign and he was bestowed a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Hefner also became immersed on Hollywood’s innovative neighborhood, producing such functions as Roman Polanski’s Macbeth and Monty Python’s first film. In 1978, Hefner started the annual Playboy Jazz Festival, an annual occasion event with some of the very best jazz artists on the planet.

Fabulously50 Playboy Magazine Hugh Hefner

Is Playboy Magazine still hot 60 years later? Playboy believes so. As part of its 60th anniversary celebration, the Playboy has actually reprinted copies of its inaugural issue from December 1953. This collector’s edition is a precise replica of Playboy’s first issue, right down to the staples that bind it and Marilyn Monroe gracing Playboy’s cover. The star is likewise showcased inside as the “Sweetheart of the Month”, together with a Sherlock Holmes story by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, a feature on “desk designs for the modern workplace” and the normal cartoons and celebration jokes.

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